Assessing spoken communication - workplace assessment

Communication and Health Literacy

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Acknowledgement

This assessment tool is influenced by and includes content from D DeWalt et al., Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit: Communication Self-Assessment, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville MD, 2014, viewed 21 July 2014, www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/quality-resources/tools/literacy-toolkit/index.html

Directions

Select one answer that most accurately describes your Service:

  • Doing well:  Our service is doing this well
  • Could be better:  Our service is doing this, but could do it better
  • Not doing:  Our service is not doing this
  • Not sure or N/A:  I don't know the answer, or it is not applicable to our service
No.QuestionDoing wellCould be betterNot doingNot sure / N/A
1.Staff have received training in health literacy and communication.    
2.There is widespread support across staff for excellent communication.    
3.Staff routinely offer people directions to various places within the facility, using everyday words.    

4.

Reception and other relevant staff                
routinely offer to help consumers
fill in forms.

    

5.

Frontline staff can identify behaviours
that may indicate literacy difficulties.

    

6.

Staff use plain language when
communicating with consumers
and avoid medical jargon
(e.g. 'hypertension').

    

7.

When communicating with
consumers, staff routinely limit
information to less than five main
points.

    

8.

When providing instructions,
staff are clear and specific
(e.g., 'Take one tablet every
day, at the same time every day'.

    

9.

Staff speak at an appropriate pace.

    

10.

Staff use visual aids to promote
better understanding and information
recall.

    

11.

Staff back-up spoken communication
with written information tailored to
each person's needs, explain the written
information and highlight important
sections or points.

    

12.

Staff use the Teach-back method or
similar to check they have
communicated effectively.

    

13.

Staff encourage people to ask questions
by using phrases like: 'What questions
do you have?' not 'Do you have any
questions?'

    

14.

Staff know how and when to access
language services for people who do
not speak English well.

    

15.

Staff refer to familiar landmarks when
telling people how to get to the service.

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January 2019