Medication and health literacy - workplace assessment tool

Communication and Health Literacy

Print version

Acknowledgement

The structure and content of this assessment tool is influenced by D DeWalt et al. Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville MD, 2014, viewed 21 July 2014, www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/quality-resources/tools/literacy-toolkit/index.html

Directions

Select one answer that most accurately describes your Service:

  • Doing well:  Our service is doing this well
  • Could be better:  Our service is doing this, but could do it better
  • Not doing:  Our service is not doing this
  • Not sure or N/A:  I don't know the answer, or it is not applicable to our service
No.QuestionDoing wellCould be betterNot doingNot sure / NA

1

Staff use plain, everyday language

    

2

Staff create an environment that encourages people to ask questions and be involved in their care

    

3

Medical or pharmacy staff review medications with clients at least once a year and after significant medical events

    

4

Clinical staff discuss ways to remember medication regimes and offer help setting up a system (for example, a pill box or chart)

    

5

Clinical staff confirm they have explained medications and medication regimes effectively, using the Teach-back method or similar

    

6

Clinical staff use unambiguous language when giving instructions, and avoid or explain phrases like:

  • take on an empty stomach
  • regular dosage essential
  • complete the whole course
  • take four times a day
    

7

Staff provide written information tailored to the person's needs, explaining their medications and medication regimes

    

January 2019